How Much Do Pygmy Goats Cost?

Pygmy goats make lovely pets. They are good-natured, cooperative, responsive, and can help clear your backyard. They are contented if they have plenty of space to roam around. And, as long as they’re not alone, these adorable animals will always remain your happy pills.

Want to own one? You might be fortunate to get a pygmy goat for free if you have a breeder for a friend. But if you have no such connections, you can always purchase them either online or after visiting a barn.

That said, how much do pygmy goats cost?

Pygmy goat vector

Average Cost Of Pygmy Goats

How much will you have to pay to own a pygmy goat? Cost Evaluation says that the price range for this pet runs around $150 to $500. The figures are lower if you opt for a castrated male or an old one. The said types cost around $50 to $100.

Not all pygmy goats, though, are affordable. For instance, show quality types can cost as high as several thousand dollars.

The average cost of pygmy goats will depend on these factors:

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Breeder/seller
  • Whether the goat is registered or not
  • Whether it is purebred or crossbred

Sample Pygmy Goats Prices

Some breeders in the US maintain a website through which they sell their pygmy goats. Others, like animal owners themselves, sell their pets online through sites like Craigslist and Hoobly. Let’s take a look at some prices posted online.

You can find varying pygmy goat’s prices on Hoobly.com. To further aid you in your search, the website has a location filter. That means you can check if there’s an available animal in your state. For instance, there are ads for goats in Alabama, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York.

As for the price, there are pygmy goats that sell for as low as $75. The higher cost is about $300.

You can also search pygmy goats by location on Craigslist. The prices advertised on the website run anywhere from $50 to $400.

Costs Of Raising Pygmy Goats

Purchase price aside, what are the costs of owning pygmy goats? Well, you should prepare a budget for maintenance expenses including shelter, food, and healthcare.

  • Shelter
  • Your pygmy goats need some protection from the elements. A run-in shed is sufficient if you’re keeping a few of them. Or you can opt for a barn if your pets are already adults. One rule is that you should allocate 12-15 square feet of barn space per adult.
  • The cost is proportional to the size of the shed. You’ll spend more the larger the shelter you plan to build for your pygmy goats.
  • For instance, Hunterdon Mill and Machine Supply charges $1,045 for a 4×8 shed and $2,020 for an 8×12 one. The metal roof, on the other hand, costs $130 to $200 depending on size.
  • Food
  • Contrary to what others might expect, pygmy goats are not grazers. That means they can’t be contented with just nibbling on grass. Their diet should include forage (except for lactating kids) and grain for lactating does and kids. Vitamins and minerals are also dietary requirements.
  • The cost of feeding your pygmy goats will depend on the condition of your pets. For instance, lactating does require sufficient grain to produce enough milk. Check this cost guide to understand how you can create a budget plan for their food.
  • Health Care
  • Pygmy goats can suffer from various ailments such as Johne’s disease, coccidiosis, and pneumonia. You should seek professional help for the treatment of the animals, and that will cost you some money.
  • Note that there are not so many veterinarians who specialize in treating pygmy goats. So, to save yourself the hassle, establish a working relationship with a vet who is familiar with the animal before you buy it.
  • Vaccinations for pygmy goats are available online. Take, for instance, online seller Jeffers, which has vaccines costing as low as $4 to as much as $150+.

Considerations Before Buying Pygmy Goats

Pygmy goats are considered livestock. With that said, the local government has rules and regulations that you should follow if you wish to take in this type of animals. Make sure that you’re allowed to have one in your location by checking the public office.

You should also consider your neighbors. Not all people can tolerate it when goats are loud. So, before buying one, you might want to ask the neighborhood if it’s fine with them.

Also, make sure that the whole household approves the adoption of pygmy goats. This way, they can give a hand in taking care of the animals.

You can go buy pygmy goats if it’s alright with the local government, your neighbors, and your family. And we say “goats”, as the animal are social creatures. Unless you want a depressed pet from day 1, consider buying two or more of them.

Tips For Buying Pygmy Goats

You’d naturally want premium quality pygmy goats since you’re going to spend hundreds of dollars to own them. But how do you know if you’re getting what you pay for? Here are some tips:

  • Opt for a registered pygmy goat.
  • A registered pygmy goat is a real one. Otherwise, it can’t be acknowledged by registries such as the American Goat Society.
  • You wouldn’t like it if your pet turns out to be a 200-pound dairy goat in the future. With a registered animal, you’re sure to get the smaller breed.
  • Make sure the pygmy goat is healthy.
  • No one wants an ill pet, right? Your pygmy goat should have received vaccinations, was dewormed by its breeder and has undergone herd testing for diseases like TB and CAE.
  • To make sure you’re not purchasing a dying goat, request a health record from the breeder.
  • Make sure your pygmy goat matches your purpose for buying them.
  • Do you want a pygmy goat as your pet, for breeding, or for a show? Each purpose has corresponding qualities. For instance, if you want to breed goats, make sure you’re buying a fertile one. If you want to enter competitions, buy an animal that has no disqualifying traits (such as a crooked face or genetic hornlessness).

It’s important to know the answer on how much do pygmy goats cost. But it’s also essential to learn how you can buy a real one. A final advice: do not buy from a seller that gives you even a tinge of doubt.

Good luck on your pygmy goat search!

Author Bio

Carlye Yancey

Between internships, volunteering, and paid jobs over the last 4 years, I have pretty much-gained experience with domesticated animals. Currently being in school for my veterinary technology degree, I spend my leisure time with 3 critters that I own.
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