How Much Does Dog Splenectomy Cost?

dog digestive system showing splene

Thanks to the spleen, your dog is able to automatically fight off infections and remove old red blood cells. The dark red organ that lies in the abdomen and attaches to the border of the stomach is part of your puffin’s immune system.

Sometimes, disorders affect the way that the spleen normally functions, so there is no choice but to have the part removed through surgery. What and how much does it take to actually get this organ detached?

Are the effects of the splenectomy long-term? What are the other things you should consider for your pet?

This article aims to give the answers to your questions about the cost to remove a dog’s spleen and other factors to remember.

Cost of Splenectomy

The cost of splenectomy on a dog is pricier than splenectomy on a cat, yet cheaper than on a horse. In Jarrettsville Veterinary Center, it ranges from $800 to $1,200.

On the other hand, PADS or Pet Affordable Dentistry and Surgery in Virginia charges dog owners $875 for the operation. These two veterinary centers are known to offer cheap yet high-quality services for your pet’s medical needs.

Expenses Before Splenectomy

Before the removal of spleen from your dog, it will be required to undergo certain examinations such as the usual complete blood count and urinalysis. Fees for an initial consultation and results analysis will also be needed from you.

  • Initial Consultation

Lakeside Vet Care offers an initial consultation for $55. As for an unscheduled/emergency check-up, the payment is $170.

  • Complete Blood Count and Urinalysis

The two are usually suggested in order for the veterinarian to examine the presence of anemia – a condition that is common in dogs with ruptured spleens. The amount payable for CBC to Countryside Animal Hospital in Maryland is $35, while $21 for urinalysis.

  • X-ray

Digital radiograph is being offered for $100 for one view, $150 for 2-3 views, and $200 for 4+ views. X-ray is the exact way to look for the spleen and it needs to capture both chest and abdomen parts.

  • Ultrasound

This digital test, on the other hand, will determine the abnormality in the spleen and other organs. In Lakeside Vet Care, ultrasound fee is not part of the pricing as the owner still has to contact the hospital for some reason.

The cost of abdominal ultrasound costs around $200 to $300.

  • Blood Transfusion

This is optional depending on your pet’s illness. In case this is advised by the doctor, the Veterinarians’ Blood Bank in Indiana offers 125ml of whole canine blood is $105.

  • Analysis of Tests

Lastly, to confirm the need for a splenectomy, the results of the test will be assessed by the vet. The cost for this usually starts at $30.

Recovery Expenses

Post-surgical treatment will always be critical so as not to worsen your captain fluff’s condition. Your dog will have to take medicines and maybe even stay in the hospital for further care.

  • Pain killers

These medicines can be bought online. Brands like Previcox ($20 per 10-count bottle), Prednisolone ($0.18 per 5-mg tablet), and Rimadyl ($32 per 30-count bottle) might be prescribed by the vet.

  • Antibiotics

If infection occurs, antibiotics might be recommended. 1800 Pet Meds offers different brands of this medicine, like Metronidazole at $0.65 per 250-mg tablet.

  • E-collar

This will also be helpful for your pup to prevent licking or opening the incision after surgery. It costs $8 to $40.

  • Post-Operative Boarding

Your pet will typically be recommended to stay confined after the surgery. The price ranges from $50-$200, depending on the level of care needed.

Cause and Symptoms of Spleen Damage

Rupture of the spleen can worsen and even become life-threatening when not cured right away. Unfortunately, doctors still can’t comprehend what spleen damage is caused by.

Oftentimes, impaired spleen function can be evident in weight loss, white gums, weakness, muscle incoordination, seizures, rapid heartbeat, and other symptoms – eventually leading to a tumor.

The disorder is more common in certain breeds, including German Shepherds, Boxers, Great Danes, English Setters, and Golden Retrievers.

To determine the exact disability, diagnostic imaging will be required, specifically x-ray and ultrasound. Abdominocentesis and CT scan may also be performed to examine blood and other problems in the abdomen.

Your veterinarian may also ask about your dog’s history regarding the progression of the affliction.

Splenectomy Procedure

Splenectomy is the only treatment for splenic tumors. Removing the organ can be done partially or entirely, although complete splenectomy is more frequently performed.

After the insertion of sedatives, blood pressure monitoring, EKG monitoring, and other processes, fully opening the abdomen is usually preferred to be done by the surgeons for fuller blood supply and a more thorough evaluation of the other parts of the body as biopsies may be collected.

Sadly, the average time of survival of the dog after the surgery due to tumor is just a few months. Chemotherapy is often demanded to extend your dog’s life.

As for conditions that are less grave such as torsion and trauma, post-splenectomy still lets your dog live normally almost without a problem. It will be rare for your pet to catch infections that may affect its red blood cells despite the possibility.

Tips to Follow After Your Dog’s Splenectomy

After the surgery, do not expect your dear dog to heal and be back to being playful after just a few days. Don’t even try to force it to become energetic and engage in exercises if you don’t want your pup to experience more problems.

Recovery may take over a month for the incision to be treated, so the best you can do is give it maximum love and care by providing it with pain killers prescribed by the veterinarian. Antibiotic medication may be needed as well in order for your dog to refrain from catching more infections.

Additionally, an e-collar is highly advised so that your pup may not be able to pull out the stitches in the stomach area.

Lastly, treatment will not be left at home since follow-up check-ups must be done and continued. Alert the veterinarian in case something unusual occurs. Make sure to obey other recommendations like therapies and other remedies for related illnesses like anemia and heart arrhythmia.

 
Dr. Patty Khuly

Patty Khuly, VMD, MBA is a prolific pet health writer, occasional media personality, and a practicing veterinary clinician (for almost 23 years!).

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